Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

Book - 1998
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Oxford University Press
The most famous of Shakespeare's Roman tragedies, Julius Caesar was written and first performed in 1599, and was apparently one the plays his contemporaries enjoyed most. Recounting the death of Caesar on the steps of the Senate house, the play offers some of Shakespeare's finest scenes: Antony's skillful speech at Caesar's funeral, and the quarrel and reconciliation between Brutus and Cassius with the news of Portia's death. This edition includes a fresh consideration of the play's date and its place in the Shakespeare canon and examines how Shakespeare reshaped his sources (primarily North's translation of Plutarch's Lives).

Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998
ISBN: 9780192836069
0192836064
Branch Call Number: 822.33 J8h 1998
Characteristics: ix, 253 p. : ill. ; 20 cm
Additional Contributors: Humphreys, A. R. (Arthur Raleigh), 1911-

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TEENREVIEWBOARD
Nov 06, 2018

Julius Caesar is a playwright tragedy written by William Shakespeare. The play starts with a celebration for Caesar after he defeated the sons of the deceased Roman general, Pompey. Cassius and Brutus, both longtime acquaintances of Caesar and each other have a conversation. Brutus says that he fears that the people want Caesar to become king, which would overturn the republic. Brutus finds letters in his house written by Roman citizens worried that Caesar has become too powerful. The letters have in fact been forged and planted by Cassius, who knows that if Brutus believes it is the people’s will, he will support a plot to remove Caesar from power. The men agree to lure Caesar from his house and kill him. If you are a fan of Shakespearean tragedies then I would recommend this novel. However I would not recommend this novel to a younger audience because the plot is confusing. The first three acts are about plotting to kill Caesar and the rest of the story is a war. It is difficult to understand all that is happening as the story progresses. Overall, I would rate this play two out of five stars.
@Sapphirereads of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

l
Love_Legolas_111
May 16, 2016

Hard to find fault with this play. Interest-catching, tragic, morally challenging. Great read.

n
niqikrystine
Aug 04, 2015

an often underrated Shakespearean title, with clever humor and classic quotes.

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l
Love_Legolas_111
May 16, 2016

“…every bondman in his own hand bears the power to cancel his captivity.” -Casca, Act 1, Scene 3

l
Love_Legolas_111
May 16, 2016

“…let the gods so speed me, as I love the name of honor more than I fear death.” -Brutus, Act 1, Scene 2

l
Love_Legolas_111
May 16, 2016

"Beware the ides of March." -Soothsayer, Act 1, Scene 2

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