Lemonade, and Other Poems Squeezed From A Single Word

Lemonade, and Other Poems Squeezed From A Single Word

Book - 2011
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Part anagram, part rebus, part riddle - this brand new poetic form turns word puzzles into poetry.
Publisher: New York : Roaring Brook Press, 2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781596435414
1596435410
Branch Call Number: 811.6 R1159L 2010 CHILD
Characteristics: 43 p. col. ill. ; 25 cm
Additional Contributors: Doniger, Nancy - Illustrator

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Do You Play With Your Words When You Read Them?

As you might have guessed from my post “There Are Not Enough Words to Describe How Much I Love Wordless Books,” I love wordless books! However, I want to assure you that I love books with words as well. I love books with real words, made up words, unusual words, hidden words, puns, and poems in forward and reverse. Authors play with words in so many ways, and I love to play along with them! … (more)


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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 16, 2012

When Poetry Month comes around kids get bombarded with the same haiku or the same limerick assignments over and over again. I like to believe that Mr. Raczka might do something to change all of that. His is a book that inspires. You almost want to take your own first and last name after reading it and make poems out of those letters yourself. So thank you, Mr. Raczka, for bringing to light a great new poetic format. For inspiring adults and kids alike to write and create.

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 16, 2012

ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD thinks this title is suitable for 7 years and over

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Jul 16, 2012

Take a word. Now find as many words as you can out of that word. Now take those words and make a cohesive, coherent, and downright good poem. Impossible? Not if you ask Bob Raczka. Inspired by poet Andrew Russ’s “one-word poems”, Raczka manages to find and write twenty-two such poems. Sometimes they are short (the poem “friends” really just boils down to “fred finds ed”). Sometimes they are longer than you’d expect (“spaghetti” starts with “papa has a pasta appetite”). And in each poem you have to read the letters as they appear under their starting words on one page, and then in order as a normal poem on the next. A clever literary technique yields even cleverer little poems. This is a premise that surpasses its initial gimmick.

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