How the Hippies Saved Physics

How the Hippies Saved Physics

Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival

Book - 2011
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Baker & Taylor
Describes how a quirky band of misfit science students at Berkeley in the 1970s altered the course of modern physics while studying quantum theory alongside Eastern mysticism and psychic mind reading while lounging in hot tubs and dabbling with LSD.

Norton Pub
Today, quantum information theory is among the most exciting scientific frontiers, attracting billions of dollars in funding and thousands of talented researchers. But as MIT physicist and historian David Kaiser reveals, this cutting-edge field has a surprisingly psychedelic past. How the Hippies Saved Physics introduces us to a band of freewheeling physicists who defied the imperative to “shut up and calculate” and helped to rejuvenate modern physics.For physicists, the 1970s were a time of stagnation. Jobs became scarce, and conformity was encouraged, sometimes stifling exploration of the mysteries of the physical world. Dissatisfied, underemployed, and eternally curious, an eccentric group of physicists in Berkeley, California, banded together to throw off the constraints of the physics mainstream and explore the wilder side of science. Dubbing themselves the “Fundamental Fysiks Group,” they pursued an audacious, speculative approach to physics. They studied quantum entanglement and Bell’s Theorem through the lens of Eastern mysticism and psychic mind-reading, discussing the latest research while lounging in hot tubs. Some even dabbled with LSD to enhance their creativity. Unlikely as it may seem, these iconoclasts spun modern physics in a new direction, forcing mainstream physicists to pay attention to the strange but exciting underpinnings of quantum theory.A lively, entertaining story that illuminates the relationship between creativity and scientific progress, How the Hippies Saved Physics takes us to a time when only the unlikeliest heroes could break the science world out of its rut.
Named one of the Top Physics Books of 2012 by Physics WorldThe surprising story of eccentric young scientists who stood up to convention—and changed the face of modern physics.

Book News
While mainstream physics was preoccupied with the Cold War, the Fundamental Fysiks Group formed in 1975 in Berkeley, CA, on the fringes of the "new physics." Physicist Kaiser (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) traces the group's history, colorful figures (Fritjof Capra, Jack Sarfatti), counterculture pursuits and devotees, CIA interest in their experiments in parapsychology, and contributions to quantum information science, e.g., early adoption of Bell's theorem which Einstein had disavowed as "spooky actions at a distance." Included are photographs and illustrations to explain phenomena. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Baker
& Taylor

Describes how a quirky band of misfit science students at Berkley in the 1970s altered the course of modern physics while studying quantum theory alongside Eastern mysticism and psychic mind reading while lounging in hot tubs and dabbling with LSD. 17,000 first printing.

Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780393076363
0393076369
Branch Call Number: 530.09227 K1231h 2011
Characteristics: xxvi, 372 p. : ill. ; 25 cm

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stewstealth
Mar 25, 2012

Not sure if this subject required a whole book- Quick to read. About the personalities in the 1960's and 1970's who helped revitalize thought experiments on quantum entanglement which ultimately led to actual experiments and new insight.

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