This Changes Everything

This Changes Everything

Capitalism Vs. the Climate

Book - 2014
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Baker & Taylor
The best-selling author of The Shock Doctor explains why the environmental crisis challenges us to abandon "free market" ideologies and remake political systems, arguing that a massive reduction of greenhouse emissions may offer a best chance for correcting economic challenges. 150,000 first printing.

Baker
& Taylor

Explains why the environmental crisis should lead to an abandonment of "free market" ideologies and current political systems, arguing that a massive reduction of greenhouse emissions may offer a best chance for correcting problems.

Simon and Schuster
The most important book yet from the author of the international bestseller The Shock Doctrine, a brilliant explanation of why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In short, either we embrace radical change ourselves or radical changes will be visited upon our physical world. The status quo is no longer an option.

In This Changes Everything Naomi Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein meticulously builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies. She exposes the ideological desperation of the climate-change deniers, the messianic delusions of the would-be geoengineers, and the tragic defeatism of too many mainstream green initiatives. And she demonstrates precisely why the market has not—and cannot—fix the climate crisis but will instead make things worse, with ever more extreme and ecologically damaging extraction methods, accompanied by rampant disaster capitalism.

Klein argues that the changes to our relationship with nature and one another that are required to respond to the climate crisis humanely should not be viewed as grim penance, but rather as a kind of gift—a catalyst to transform broken economic and cultural priorities and to heal long-festering historical wounds. And she documents the inspiring movements that have already begun this process: communities that are not just refusing to be sites of further fossil fuel extraction but are building the next, regeneration-based economies right now.

Can we pull off these changes in time? Nothing is certain. Nothing except that climate change changes everything. And for a very brief time, the nature of that change is still up to us.

Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, 2014
Edition: First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition
ISBN: 9781451697384
1451697384
9781451697391
Branch Call Number: 363.73874 K6728t 2014
Characteristics: x, 566 pages ; 24 cm

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From Library Staff

Capitalism vs. the Climate? In this country, capitalism is going to win that battle every time. But Naomi Klein, with this book, is at least trying to get the conversation started.


From the critics


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r
red_dog_14987
Jan 28, 2020

This book is why capitalism with out regulation is bad for the environment ( and also economically for everyone who is not in the top 10%. ) This is why trump's policy of "for every regulation you have to get rid of 2 regulations" is completely a** backwards. It is something a not very bright child would come up with. Regulations are put in place to keep our air and water clean. It is so the bankers and former bankers (trump's cabinet) don't cheat the middle class.

SCL_Justin Jun 01, 2019

It's hard to believe this book is five years old, that it predates Trump and that the world is still burning down. I appreciate Klein's thesis that climate change isn't something we can handle with bits and pieces of cap-and-trade legislation, but only by dismantling the petrochemical based culture and society we have. A country that has its fate dictated by purveyors of poison like Enbridge and Shell is unlikely to ever do anything to actually protect and help humans. That this book focuses quite clearly on terrible projects like Enbridge's Northern Gateway Pipeline and all these other things that the public is investing in is important. That we need to change people's minds about the importance of oil company profits compared to having a livable planet is both hopeful (Klein gives examples of how this has worked in other places) and depressing (because we've been trained to believe that our fellow humans are greedy and terrible and will only look after their own self interest, which is what capital wants us to think).

Anyway. This is a great book that I highly recommend.

c
cperezolivares
May 10, 2019

Naomi Klein This changes everything was one of the most longest book I've ever read and I have to say, I enjoyed every minute of it. It talked not just about climate change, it also reference how policy, politics, green organization and countries are affecting the society we live today. I highly recommend this book for whoever is looking for a book that is more than Climate change and want to get an answer of why people are fighting for this cause or trying to solve this.

d
devinhock
Sep 19, 2018

A must-read, Klein's thoughts are well-structured and the book overall is incredibly easy to delve into. The words in this book address the bleakness of the current climate crisis but also offer hope and encouragement. This book has something for everyone, no matter where your knowledge level is on climate change and the broader issues connected to it.

j
jaybird443
Dec 14, 2017

I'm not a climate change denier at all. It is real and is going to be a big problem both now and especially for future generations. My complaint about this book and many other books on this topic is that for some reason they do not address the real problem, which is over population. When I was young there was 3B people on the planet. Currently there is 7B. At current growth rates no matter what measures are taken to reduce our personal carbon footprint we are going to smother our planet with too many people. Lets start identifying the real problem which is completely out of control - world population growth.

What the prospective reader needs to know about THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING is that it is over 450 pages of 9-point type with 60 pages of endnotes of 7-point type -- which is to say this is not a light easy read, even though Klein is a gifted writer. It took a triumph of the will for me to finish it. The book swirls and eddies, shoots like a rocket and then floats back down to earth. Klein tosses in everything but the kitchen sink. The first half the book is the conventional narrative: the climate-change-denial industry vs. the scientific consensus. The hinge of the book is a fascinating look at the "super-tech will save us" field of geoengineering. The last half is the most compelling. Klein talks about "Blockadia," her term for local citizen resistance to behemoth corporate extractivist industry. She talks about Keystone XL and the role of Indigenous peoples in the climate justice movement. She talks about her own difficulties in getting pregnant and the Deepwater Horizon catastrophe. In the end she compares the movement to address climate change to the abolition movement of the 19th century, an analogy which lets us know there is plenty of bloodshed to come.

h
heidiup1
Mar 27, 2016

a bit dry for me, but very well-written

d
dias111
Mar 26, 2016

Great content though not as well organized and written as her previous work.

h
HowardWilliams
Dec 31, 2015

Heart's in the right place but the book is barely readable and certainly not an attractive or persuasive tool.

hugatree Dec 26, 2015

I've just read Gendeg's comment-review and I'm confused. My fellow patron gives details of he or she feels are the books shortcomings, recommends another book, The Sixth Extinction, in lieu of Klein's, and then says read this book. Which book? The former, by Naomi Klein or the latter?

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4jbjohnson
Dec 07, 2019

"The connection between pollution and labor exploitation has been true since the earliest days of the Industrial Revolution."

m
mamabadger56
Apr 04, 2016

"The greatest tragedy of all is that so much of this was eminently avoidable."

m
mamabadger56
Apr 04, 2016

"It's not that the companies moving their production to China wanted to drive up emissions; they were after cheap labour; but exploited workers and an exploited planet are, it turns out, a package deal. A destabilized climate is the cost of deregulated, global capitalism, its unintended, yet unavoidable consequence."

WVMLlibrarianTara Nov 02, 2014

Because, underneath all of this is the real truth we have been avoiding: climate change isn’t an “issue” to add to the list of things to worry about, next to health care and taxes. It is a civilizational wake-up call. A powerful message—spoken in the language of fires, floods, droughts, and extinctions—telling us that we need an entirely new economic model and a new way of sharing this planet. Telling us that we need to evolve.

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