The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give

eBook - 2017
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8 starred reviews ∙ Goodreads Choice Awards Best of the Best William C. Morris Award Winner ∙ National Book Award Longlist ∙ Printz Honor Book ∙ Coretta Scott King Honor Book ∙ #1 New York Times Bestseller!

"Absolutely riveting!" —Jason Reynolds

"Stunning." —John Green

"This story is necessary. This story is important." —Kirkus (starred review)

"Heartbreakingly topical." —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"A marvel of verisimilitude." —Booklist (starred review)

"A powerful, in-your-face novel." —Horn Book (starred review)

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

And don't miss On the Come Up, Angie Thomas's powerful follow-up to The Hate U Give.

Publisher: HarperCollins

Opinion


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From the critics


Community Activity

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i
ilokaye53
Jun 23, 2020

Actually true in regards to how people are manipulated when they refuse to think for themselves.
Everyone has free will. How you use it for the better good is up to you.

l
LizaOctober7
Jun 11, 2020

The hate u give is funny and heartbreaking, while also effectively delivering a very important message. This book is realistic to the point where it feels a little like I am Starr. 5/5

Not only is this book hilarious, well-written, heartbreaking, surprising, and addictive, it is so IMPORTANT. It made me feel everything so much, and I can't believe how masterfully Angie Thomas took so much of what's wrong with the world and made it into this masterpiece of YA lit that everyone should read.

JCLAlisonS Apr 23, 2020

Instead of writing caricatures of teens, Thomas has breathed life into vivid characters - ones who talk like real-life teens, are flawed and lost but also insightful and self-aware.

We meet Starr Carter - a sixteen year-old girl with strong roots in a rough community who attends a predominantly white private school. Starr has seen her fair share of strife and also carries with her a traumatic episode from her childhood. When she again bears witness to a devastating and eye-opening incident, the fracture between her two worlds feels irreparable. Is it?

This one is definitely a must-read.

c
creativegirly123
Mar 25, 2020

The Hate U Give, is one of those books that will stay with you forever. It may be a YA book, but it should be read by all adults, not just young ones. It contains some very powerful, hard-hitting messages. Important messages, that hopefully will change the way you look at certain parts of society, and make you understand that not all what you deem to be true, actually is.

This isn’t a police-bashing book though, far from it. Yes, there is conflict with the law, but the conflict also goes much deeper within the community too. The author has given you the opportunity to discover what really happens in poor, predominantly-black neighbourhoods in the USA. The book may be fictional, but the basis is very real.

Filled with characters that you can relate to, and scenarios that you read about far too often, this book will touch your heart. Gut-wrenchingly honest, it will have your emotions going into overdrive. It is also uplifting in the way that Starr deals with the aftermath of the shooting, and her courage to stand up for what she believes in.

I loved the way her mother is portrayed, and the manner in which she views and relates to the world, with her positive, yet realistic attitude. Then you have the very different personalities that her brothers Sekani and Seven bring to the story, especially Seven’s young, humorous outlook on life. When it came to her dad, Maverick, although I found him very wise, and he loved his family dearly, he often viewed society as us, and them.

Written with such elegance, and passion, it is hard to believe that this is Ms. Thomas’s debut novel. It held me captivated to the pages, and to Starr, her family and her friends’ lives. It is a real eye-opener. A similar novel is All American Boys which also contains the theme: police brutality.

p
PiggyReads
Mar 23, 2020

The profanity is very excessive.

sarahbru17 Feb 11, 2020

Characters: 10/10
Plot: 8/10
Writing: 9/10
Thomas' book deserves all the acclaim it has received. It was refreshing to read something that really got me into the head of a character who is very different from me. The book's conflict was frustrating, which was exactly the point--it didn't have the nice clean, tied-up resolution that we've come to expect from fiction, which really drives home the theme of the novel.

andkel Jan 15, 2020

A powerful book dealing with relevant topics in the world today. Recommended for all readers teenagers and adults, to get insight to how people, in other communities, are dealing with tough life experiences.

d
duckcalldan
Jan 12, 2020

A really really talented YA author.

e
Ethiopianwolf
Jan 01, 2020

Tough book about a tough subject. I recommend it to those who want an honest look at police brutality through the lens of an African-American.

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Age

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v
violet_dog_11845
Jul 03, 2020

violet_dog_11845 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

n
NCHACHOU
Jun 06, 2020

NCHACHOU thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

p
pink_swan_291
Jun 02, 2020

pink_swan_291 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

zellisthebest thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

m
miraellie
Apr 08, 2020

miraellie thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

p
PiggyReads
Mar 23, 2020

PiggyReads thinks this title is suitable for 99 years and over

e
Ethiopianwolf
Jan 01, 2020

Ethiopianwolf thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

w
white_wolf_1351
Oct 09, 2019

white_wolf_1351 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

r
red_dog_23465
Aug 21, 2019

red_dog_23465 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

j
jinjier_kookies_
Jul 25, 2019

jinjier_kookies_ thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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Notices

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z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Other: Racism.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Sexual Content: Talks about sex.

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Violence: Rioting, Shootings

z
zellisthebest
May 22, 2020

Coarse Language: A lot of swear words.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Sexual Content: Nothing actually happens but it's implied.

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Violence: Shootings, police brutality

b
blue_eagle_2085
Mar 09, 2019

Coarse Language: Lots of curse words.

d
donutwombat
Aug 27, 2017

Violence: Witness of murder

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Violence: police shooting, vivid description of a friend's death

c
CYU_BJ
Aug 01, 2017

Coarse Language: extreme profanity, but not to the extent that teenagers can't handle

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Quotes

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m
miraellie
Apr 08, 2020

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.”

CMLibrary_gjd Mar 24, 2019

pg 17 But even if I grew up in it, I wouldn't understand fighting over streets nobody owns.

pg 65 Khalil matters to us, not the stuff he did

pg 165 Her words (Mom) used to have power. If she said it was fine, it was fine. But after you've held two people as they took their last breaths, words like that don't mean shit anymore.

l
LexiLou2
Jan 08, 2019

We let people say stuff, and they say it so much that it becomes okay to them and normal for us. What's the point of having a voice if you're gonna be silent in those moments you shouldn't be?

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

It seems like they always talk about what he may have said, what he may have done, what he may not have done. I didn’t know a dead person could be charged in his own murder, you know?

Summary

Add a Summary
a
auri_12
Feb 08, 2019

Starr, the young lady, had a somewhat difficult life. In school she was one person but at home and in her neighborhood she was another. One weekend she went out with her friend. Then she saw an old friend,Khalil, and they just danced. Khalil and Starr then left the party and Khalil was driving Starr home. They got pulled over and the officer had Khalil come out the car while Starr had her hands on the dashboard because her father had taught her what to do in case of these things since she is black. Khalil was joking around and reached into the car and the officer got scared and shot him. That's where it started, Starr was very upset and scared. She was scared to talk about what happened since Khalil was in a gang and the gang would come after her even if the main one was her uncle. A lot happened after that but Starr got the courage and finally stood for what was right.

s
shayshortt
Apr 18, 2017

Starr Carter is a girl with a foot in two worlds. By day, she attends Williamson, a suburban prep school where she is one of only two black students in her year. In the evening, she goes home to Garden Heights, the city’s poor, black neighbourhood, where she has lived all her life. She is one person at home and another person at school, because she can’t be too “bougie” in the neighbourhood, or too “ghetto” at school. But the wall she has carefully built between her two selves begins to crumble when she is the only witness to a police officer shooting and killing her childhood friend, Khalil. The killing gains national headlines as protestors take to the streets to protest the murder of yet another unarmed black boy. In the day’s following Khalil’s death, Starr faces a choice between remaining silent, and speaking up. But even if she can find her voice, will it be enough to get justice for Khalil?

SPL_Brittany Apr 09, 2017

"Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right."

Sixteen year old Starr moves between two worlds: the poor neighbourhood where she lives and the affluent high school she attends. The uneasy balance is shattered when she becomes a witness to the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil, at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was black, unarmed, and doing nothing wrong.

Soon afterwards, the media gains interest, and Khalil’s death becomes a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, a gangbanger even a drug dealer. While the police don’t seem interested in finding out what really happened, rioting begins and protesters take to the streets in Khalil’s name, as his death ignites long held tensions between the black community and their treatment by the police.

Throughout, Starr struggles with her identity as her two worlds collide. Her fear is palpable as she confronts system that she knows is working against her. She’s afraid to speak out yet worries that if she does not Khalil’s murderer could escape justice. Will she find her voice for Khalil?

Angie Thomas writes a beautiful, timely and emotionally charged novel about a teenage girl dealing with very real and complex relationships. Thomas confronts issues of race and class sending an incredibly powerful message to readers as well as those wanting to understand the blacklivesmatter movement. Her writing style and characters will engage you from page one, and will have readers falling in love with the entire Carter family. An engrossing and refreshing read, it is hard to believe that this is Thomas’s first novel, already the rights have been given for this to be made into a feature film.

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